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Reblogged from emergentfutures  15 notes
emergentfutures:

In-vitro meat unlikely to become reliable food source


‘I think in-vitro meat is a fantastic way of introducing novelty foods for the rich,’’ says Oron Catts, who heads a world-renowned bio-art laboratory called SymbioticA, based at the University of Western Australia.
‘‘It’s never going to be a way to feed the world – there’s no way to upscale the process to that level,’’ he says. ‘‘The world will never be fed by factory-grown meat.’’


Full Story: The Age

emergentfutures:

In-vitro meat unlikely to become reliable food source

‘I think in-vitro meat is a fantastic way of introducing novelty foods for the rich,’’ says Oron Catts, who heads a world-renowned bio-art laboratory called SymbioticA, based at the University of Western Australia.

‘‘It’s never going to be a way to feed the world – there’s no way to upscale the process to that level,’’ he says. ‘‘The world will never be fed by factory-grown meat.’’

Full Story: The Age

Reblogged from emergentfutures  60 notes
emergentfutures:

As the potential drone applications grow, so does the build-your-own drone movement

Two trends have driven this expansion: open source technology and the “makers” or DIY movement.
The technology has gotten better and more readily available. Drones and the sensors used to optimize them have gotten smaller. The push to open source technology and coding has made software to program drones readily available. “Because the software is open source, people can download it and use it as is,” says Vo, who develops and optimizes algorithms for use in drones as part of his research. “They don’t have to tweak it at all if they don’t want to.” If people tweak their code for niche drone applications, they can publish it online for another coder to use.
Full Story: The Smithsonian

emergentfutures:

As the potential drone applications grow, so does the build-your-own drone movement



Two trends have driven this expansion: open source technology and the “makers” or DIY movement.

The technology has gotten better and more readily available. Drones and the sensors used to optimize them have gotten smaller. The push to open source technology and coding has made software to program drones readily available. “Because the software is open source, people can download it and use it as is,” says Vo, who develops and optimizes algorithms for use in drones as part of his research. “They don’t have to tweak it at all if they don’t want to.” If people tweak their code for niche drone applications, they can publish it online for another coder to use.




Full Story: The Smithsonian

Reblogged from kylegreggy  136,139 notes

Food doesn’t taste better or worse when documented by Instagram. Laughter is as genuine over Skype as it would be sharing a sofa. Pay attention. Take in nature, hold someone’s hand, read a book. But don’t ever apologize for snapping a photo of a sunrise after a hike, or blogging about the excitement of having a crush, or updating your goodreads account. All of these things are good and should be celebrated. Smile at strangers on the sidewalk and like your friends’ selfies. It’s all good for the human spirit. By @cogitoergoblog  (via creatingaquietmind)

Reblogged from fastcompany  330 notes

fastcompany:

Turn Old Bottles Into iPhone Cases With This 3-D Printer From Will.i.am And Coca-Cola

You probably know will.i.am best as founder and frontman of hip-hop group The Black Eyed Peas. But in the past three years, when he’s not singing about lovely lady lumps, he has been busy as Chief Creative Officer of U.S. manufacturer 3D Systems, designing a 3-D printer that aims to help reduce plastic waste.

His Ekocycle Cube 3-D Printer—designed by 3D Systems for home use and developed in collaboration with Coca-Cola—turns recycled plastic bottles into anything from guitar picks to iPhone cases.

Read More>

Reblogged from fastcompany  34 notes
fastcompany:

What Facebook’s second-largest market reveals about its international ambitions
“This is how Facebook sees itself: As the most promising entry point to the Internet for the as-yet-unwired population. And the more that Facebook can blur the line so that Indians come to believe that Facebook is the Internet, rather than something you get when you go onto the Internet, the better it’ll be for Facebook.”
Read More>

fastcompany:

What Facebook’s second-largest market reveals about its international ambitions

This is how Facebook sees itself: As the most promising entry point to the Internet for the as-yet-unwired population. And the more that Facebook can blur the line so that Indians come to believe that Facebook is the Internet, rather than something you get when you go onto the Internet, the better it’ll be for Facebook.”

Read More>

Reblogged from kenyatta  328 notes

As University of California–Irvine professor of mathematics Alice Silverberg commented: When I was a student, women in the generation above me told horror stories about discrimination, and added ‘But everything has changed. That will never happen to you.’ I’m told that this was said even by the generations before that, and now my generation is saying similar things to the next one. Of course, a decade or so later we always say, ‘How could we have thought that was equality?’ Are we serving the next generation well if we tell them that everything is equal and fair when it’s not? By Delusions of Gender:  How Our Minds, Society, and Neurosexism Create Difference by Cordelia Fine (via takealookatyourlife)

Reblogged from notational  16 notes
notational:

Steve Jobs, along with whatever else we’re crediting to him, should be granted the patent on converting the universal human gesture for trying to remember something from looking above one’s head to fumbling in one’s pants pocket. I’m pretty sure I read somewhere that most pre-industrial composers could creditably reproduce an entire symphony after hearing it only once, not because they were autistic but simply because they had to. We’ve all heard Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos hundreds of times more than Bach ever did, and where our ancestors might have had only one or two images by which to remember their consumptive forebears, we have hours of footage of ours circling the luxury-cruise midnight buffet tables. Sometimes, I’ve noticed with horror that the memories I have of things like my daughter’s birthday parties or the trips we’ve taken together are actually memories of the photographs I took, not of the events themselves, and together, the two somehow become ever more worn and overwrought, like lines gone over too many times in a drawing. The more we give over of ourselves to these devices, the less of our own minds it appears we exercise, and worse, perhaps even concomitantly, the more we coddle and covet the devices themselves. The gestures necessary to operate our new touch-sensitive generation of technology are disturbingly similar to caresses. (via Cover Story: All Together Now : The New Yorker)
- Chris Ware.
I think this cover is a masterpiece. (Justin)

notational:

Steve Jobs, along with whatever else we’re crediting to him, should be granted the patent on converting the universal human gesture for trying to remember something from looking above one’s head to fumbling in one’s pants pocket. I’m pretty sure I read somewhere that most pre-industrial composers could creditably reproduce an entire symphony after hearing it only once, not because they were autistic but simply because they had to. We’ve all heard Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos hundreds of times more than Bach ever did, and where our ancestors might have had only one or two images by which to remember their consumptive forebears, we have hours of footage of ours circling the luxury-cruise midnight buffet tables. Sometimes, I’ve noticed with horror that the memories I have of things like my daughter’s birthday parties or the trips we’ve taken together are actually memories of the photographs I took, not of the events themselves, and together, the two somehow become ever more worn and overwrought, like lines gone over too many times in a drawing. The more we give over of ourselves to these devices, the less of our own minds it appears we exercise, and worse, perhaps even concomitantly, the more we coddle and covet the devices themselves. The gestures necessary to operate our new touch-sensitive generation of technology are disturbingly similar to caresses. (via Cover Story: All Together Now : The New Yorker)

- Chris Ware.

I think this cover is a masterpiece. (Justin)