Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
you-are-another-me:

The world is full of beautiful people. An anonymous man in Saudi Arabia installed a giant refrigerator in front of his house. He and his neighbors leave their leftovers in it daily, providing free food for the less fortunate children in his town. He wants to spare them the “shame” of begging, and provide them with proper meals instead. 

you-are-another-me:

The world is full of beautiful people. An anonymous man in Saudi Arabia installed a giant refrigerator in front of his house. He and his neighbors leave their leftovers in it daily, providing free food for the less fortunate children in his town. He wants to spare them the “shame” of begging, and provide them with proper meals instead. 

Reblogged from kylegreggy  1,300 notes

fotojournalismus:

Sarajevo then and nowBosnia reopens once-destroyed “Vijecnica”

Sarajevo’s landmark 19th century city hall-turned-National Library re-opened on May 9, 2014 with its old glory fully restored, 22 years after it was destroyed by Serb shelling during the siege of the city along with its almost 2 million books and manuscripts. More than 10,000 people died during the 43-month siege of Sarajevo in which Bosnian Serbs took control of the hills surrounding the city, bombarding it with shells and killing civilians with snipers as they sought food and water. (Photos by Dado Ruvic/Reuters)

Reblogged from guardian  600 notes
guardian:

Matter will be created from light within a year, claim scientists
Researchers have worked out how to make matter from pure light and are drawing up plans to demonstrate the feat within the next 12 months.
The theory underpinning the idea was first described 80 years ago by two physicists who later worked on the first atomic bomb. At the time they considered the conversion of light into matter impossible in a laboratory.
But physicists at Imperial College London claim to have cracked the problem using high-powered lasers and other equipment now available to scientists. Full story »
Photograph: Lawrence Manning/Corbis

guardian:

Matter will be created from light within a year, claim scientists

Researchers have worked out how to make matter from pure light and are drawing up plans to demonstrate the feat within the next 12 months.

The theory underpinning the idea was first described 80 years ago by two physicists who later worked on the first atomic bomb. At the time they considered the conversion of light into matter impossible in a laboratory.

But physicists at Imperial College London claim to have cracked the problem using high-powered lasers and other equipment now available to scientists. Full story »

Photograph: Lawrence Manning/Corbis

Reblogged from inothernews  64 notes

Credit Suisse has done what no other huge bank has done in over two decades: plead guilty to criminal wrongdoing.

In a sign that global banking giants are no longer immune from criminal charges — despite public concerns that financial institutions have grown so large and interconnected that they are “too big to jail” — federal prosecutors demanded that Credit Suisse’s parent company plead guilty to helping thousands of American account holders hide their wealth and evade taxes.

In the Federal District Court in Alexandria, Va., a Credit Suisse lawyer, Alan Reifenberg, accepted the plea agreement in a 45 minute hearing before Judge Rebecca B. Smith.

As part of a deal with the Justice Department, the Swiss bank agreed to plead to one count of conspiring to aid tax evasion. Credit Suisse, which has a giant investment bank in New York and whose chief executive is an American, will also pay about $2.6 billion in penalties and hire an independent monitor for up to two years.

“This case shows that no financial institution, no matter its size or global reach, is above the law,” said Attorney General Eric Holder Jr.. “Credit Suisse conspired to help U.S. citizens hide assets in offshore accounts in order to evade paying taxes. When a bank engages in misconduct this brazen, it should expect that the Justice Department will pursue criminal prosecution to the fullest extent possible, as has happened here.”

The severe rebuke from federal prosecutors — as well as from the Federal Reserve and New York State’s banking regulator, Benjamin M. Lawsky, who agreed to punish the bank without shutting it down — stems in part from Credit Suisse’s failure to fully cooperate with the United States government.

The resulting plea deal will strike a blow at overseas tax dodging and the shadowy world of Swiss bank secrecy, which had become a hallmark of the country’s financial system and the scorn of American policy makers. The deal also signals a shift in prosecutors’ policy, representing the first time since Drexel Burnham Lambert pleaded guilty in 1989 that a giant bank has entered a guilty plea in the United States.

By

The New York Times, "Credit Suisse Pleads Guilty in Tax Evasion Case."

We had to go all the way to Switzerland to finally nail a bank on a guilty charge?  Jesus H. fucking Christ.

(via inothernews)

Reblogged from wilwheaton  571 notes

“Of all the things that make me a geek — and there are a lot of them — nothing brings me more joy, or is more important to me, than gaming,” Wheaton said in a statement. “I created Tabletop’ two years ago so I could show by example why gaming has kept me connected to my friends and family for decades. I hoped that we would inspire people everywhere to play more games, and eventually add more and more gamers to the world.
 
“I’m proud of the show we’ve made, and thrilled to make more, but TableTop wouldn’t be what it is without the community of new and veteran gamers who have embraced us as one of their own.” By Wil Wheaton’s ‘Tabletop’ Sets Crowdfunding Record With $1.4 Million Haul (via wilwheaton)

Reblogged from theatlantic  140 notes
theatlantic:

The Communist Manifesto, As a Patent Application

Great books—books that change the way we see the world, books that spur us along our paths as people and cultures—are, in their way, patents. They are innovations made manifest. They are ideas that are claimed by an author on behalf of the rest of us. They are cultural products that concern themselves, when they are at their very best, with hammocks. 
The artist and developer Sam Lavigne has taken these connections to a delightfully logical conclusion. Over at github, he posted a program that renders texts—literary, philosophical—as patent applications. “In short,” Lavigne explains, “it reframes texts as inventions or machines.” 
So! Kafka’s The Hunger Artist becomes “An apparatus and device for staring into vacancy.” Heidegger’s The Question Concerning Technology becomes “A device and system for belonging to bringing-forth.” And—my personal favorite—​The Communist Manifesto becomes “A method and device for comprehending theoretically the historical movement.” 
Read more. [Image: Sam Lavigne]

theatlantic:

The Communist Manifesto, As a Patent Application

Great books—books that change the way we see the world, books that spur us along our paths as people and cultures—are, in their way, patents. They are innovations made manifest. They are ideas that are claimed by an author on behalf of the rest of us. They are cultural products that concern themselves, when they are at their very best, with hammocks

The artist and developer Sam Lavigne has taken these connections to a delightfully logical conclusion. Over at github, he posted a program that renders texts—literary, philosophical—as patent applications. “In short,” Lavigne explains, “it reframes texts as inventions or machines.” 

So! Kafka’s The Hunger Artist becomes “An apparatus and device for staring into vacancy.” Heidegger’s The Question Concerning Technology becomes “A device and system for belonging to bringing-forth.” And—my personal favorite—​The Communist Manifesto becomes “A method and device for comprehending theoretically the historical movement.”

Read more. [Image: Sam Lavigne]

Reblogged from emergentfutures  105 notes
emergentfutures:

“Learn to Code?” Meh. “Build Something?” Now We’re Talking, Says Hopscotch’s Jocelyn Leavitt.


“Parents might say, ‘You should learn how to code,’” said Jocelyn Leavitt, co-founder and CEO of Hopscotch. “I think kids don’t necessarily respond to that, but if you’re like ‘Hey, would you like to build your own game?’ — kids are really excited about that.”……..Since then, the app has helped people save 1.5 million projects — which gives you a sense of how many people use it, as most every Hopscotch user has saved at least once — and compiled 57 million blocks of code. It’s also now easier to preview and debug programs, and to save functions for later use.

Full Story: Recode

emergentfutures:

“Learn to Code?” Meh. “Build Something?” Now We’re Talking, Says Hopscotch’s Jocelyn Leavitt.

“Parents might say, ‘You should learn how to code,’” said Jocelyn Leavitt, co-founder and CEO of Hopscotch. “I think kids don’t necessarily respond to that, but if you’re like ‘Hey, would you like to build your own game?’ — kids are really excited about that.”……..Since then, the app has helped people save 1.5 million projects — which gives you a sense of how many people use it, as most every Hopscotch user has saved at least once — and compiled 57 million blocks of code. It’s also now easier to preview and debug programs, and to save functions for later use.

Full Story: Recode