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Reblogged from georgevaldes  742 notes
emergentfutures:

Scientists solve solar energy’s burning question: how to make it cheaper than fossil fuels


In a fight between solar and fossil fuels, the latter has always had a killer question up its sleeve: “What about supercritical steam?" That’s the method by which the most advanced power stations generate electricity, superheating water until it instantly becomes steam, a feat that’s only possible (and affordable) by burning coal or gas. Or, at least it was. Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization has managed to use solar energy to the same effect, boiling liquid to temperatures of 570 degrees Celsius in a test chamber.


Full Story: Endgadget

emergentfutures:

Scientists solve solar energy’s burning question: how to make it cheaper than fossil fuels

In a fight between solar and fossil fuels, the latter has always had a killer question up its sleeve: “What about supercritical steam?" That’s the method by which the most advanced power stations generate electricity, superheating water until it instantly becomes steam, a feat that’s only possible (and affordable) by burning coal or gas. Or, at least it was. Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization has managed to use solar energy to the same effect, boiling liquid to temperatures of 570 degrees Celsius in a test chamber.

Full Story: Endgadget

Reblogged from georgevaldes  79 notes
fastcompany:

EyeQuant is a startup which isn’t too unusual in the fact that it deals with machine learning and artificial intelligence and has big-name clients like Google and Spotify. But the company’s current fascination—using machine learning to train their AI to recognize bad aesthetics and poor website design—takes it into uncharted waters. “We use machine learning and computational neuroscience to build predictive models of how humans look at web ites,” founder Fabian Stelzer told Co.Labs. “We focused on attention before but we are now branching out to more general things like why people prefer one image instead of another or what are the factors that drive trustworthiness of image.” And he’s betting that machines can be trained to detect web pages that most of us think are ugly.
Read More>

fastcompany:

EyeQuant is a startup which isn’t too unusual in the fact that it deals with machine learning and artificial intelligence and has big-name clients like Google and Spotify. But the company’s current fascination—using machine learning to train their AI to recognize bad aesthetics and poor website design—takes it into uncharted waters. “We use machine learning and computational neuroscience to build predictive models of how humans look at web ites,” founder Fabian Stelzer told Co.Labs. “We focused on attention before but we are now branching out to more general things like why people prefer one image instead of another or what are the factors that drive trustworthiness of image.” And he’s betting that machines can be trained to detect web pages that most of us think are ugly.

Read More>

Reblogged from emergentfutures  56 notes
emergentfutures:

Congratulations to Class of 2014, Most Indebted Ever

The average Class of 2014 graduate with student-loan debt has to pay back some $33,000, according to an analysis of government data by Mark Kantrowitz, publisher at Edvisors, a group of web sites about planning and paying for college. Even after adjusting for inflation that’s nearly double the amount borrowers had to pay back 20 years ago.

Full Story: WSJ

emergentfutures:

Congratulations to Class of 2014, Most Indebted Ever

The average Class of 2014 graduate with student-loan debt has to pay back some $33,000, according to an analysis of government data by Mark Kantrowitz, publisher at Edvisors, a group of web sites about planning and paying for college. Even after adjusting for inflation that’s nearly double the amount borrowers had to pay back 20 years ago.

Full Story: WSJ

Reblogged from kylegreggy  221 notes

everythingcentralasia:

Shamsia Hassani is Afghanistan’s first female street artist, emerges as a spokesperson for women’s rights in Kabul. Born in Iran to Afghan parents, Shamsia Hassani is a street and digital artist working in the country’s complex and conflicted capital, where she returned in 2005 to pursue her education in Fine Art at Kabul University. Shamsia is doing Kabul Street Art and Digital Graffiti due to security issues. Her real (in photo) and digital graffities have been exhibited in many different countries like India, Iran, Germany, Italy and nearly all foreign embassies in Kabul.

Shamsia: “Usually I am painting women with burqas in modernism shape on walls, I want to talk about their life, to find some way to remove them from darkness, to open their mind, to bring some positive changes, trying to remove all bad memories of war from everybody’s mind with covering sad city’s walls with happy colors.”
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